CFE and WINS Youth Discuss Careers in STEM

Panelists speak to Philadelphia high school students at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

In keeping with our commitment to introducing Philadelphia youth to the diverse science, technical, and medical careers available to them, students in our four youth programs–the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship, the Out4STEM Internship, and the Girls One Diaspora Club–gathered at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia with members of the Women in Natural Sciences (WINS) Program of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Together they met with a panel of outstanding women representing diverse fields in healthcare, medicine, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Joining the students were:

  • Maria Benedetto, PT, DPT, MA, PCS (CPP Fellow), Associate Clinical Professor, Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences Department, Drexel University
  • Joanna Chan, MD, Jefferson University Physician
  • Drisana Henry, MD, MPH, Adolescent Medical Fellow, Craig-Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Katherine Lynch, MLS, Senior Developer, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
  • Loni Philip Tabb, PhD., Associate Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University

Moderated by Kevin Impellizeri, Youth Program Coordinator, the panelists shared their personal journeys toward their fields and provided advice for aspiring medical and technological professionals. They proved there is no one set path to any career, explaining challenges and diversions they faced along the way. They also offered frank advice on challenges facing women professionals such as sexism and workplace harassment. They also shared the ways they cope with stress and how they found ways to relax when things get stressful. Our students offered insightful questions and gained a greater understanding of different professional pathways. We are extremely grateful to all the panelists who offered their time and expertise to these aspiring future professionals.

Let Curiosity Set Sail at the Independence Seaport Museum

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program pilot a small submarine in a pool in the lobby of the Independence Seaport Museum

Did you know that during the 1940s, the Delaware River was so polluted, no organisms that relied on oxygen to survive could live in it? Or that Frederick Douglas escaped slavery by posing as a sailor? This was one of many surprising facts the students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program learned during a recent visit to the Independence Seaport Museum.

Founded in 1960 as the Philadelphia Maritime Museum, the Independence Seaport Museum seeks “to deepen the understanding, appreciation, and experience of the Philadelphia region’s waterways.” It carries out its mission through exhibits, interactive activities, and historic artifacts. Among the items in their diverse collection are tools, paper records, model ships, and two historic maritime vessels: the Cruiser Olympia and the submarine USS Becuna. Recently, the Karabots Junior Fellows visited the Seaport Museum to learn more about maritime history, ecology, and the unique impact Philadelphia’s waterways have influenced local, national, and international history.

Upon their arrival, the students broke into small groups and took part in a photo scavenger hunt designed to immerse them in the exhibits, activities, and artifacts the Seaport Museum has to offer. Among the museum’s offerings are Tides of Freedom: African Presence on the Delaware River, a frank depiction of the African American experience in Philadelphia relative to shipping, sea travel, and manufacturing; a recreation of the bridge of a US Navy destroyer, numerous model ships (some of which were built by inmates at Eastern State Penitentiary), and a traditional boat shop where volunteers still practice boat building.

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program play a search and rescue game at the Independence Seaport Museum

After exploring the site on their own, the students took part in Ecology of the Delaware, a hands-on lesson aimed at teaching environmental history and the important role the Delaware River plays in the daily lives of people living in the Delaware Valley. During the lesson, they conducted various tests on Delaware River water, including measuring depth, temperature, PH levels, and phosphate content.

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program take part in the Ecology of the Delaware lesson at the Independence Seaport Museum

After our activities concluded, several opted to stay and explore the Cruiser Olympia and the submarine USS Becuna. Overall the experience gave our students a greater appreciation of the impact of Philadelphia’s waterways.

Now Accepting Applications for the Out4STEM Internship Program!

Students in the Out4STEM Internship Program pose wearing homemade masks

We are excited to announce the College of Physicians of Philadelphia is now accepting applications for the 2018-2019 cohort of the Out4STEM Internship Program!

The Out4STEM Internship Program is a one-year, summer and after-school internship program aimed at LGBTQIA high school students in Philadelphia who have an interest in healthcare/medicine or science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The Program also seeks to address the unique challenges facing LGBTQ youth Philadelphia in an accepting, STEM-oriented safe space. The Program takes advantage of the unique resources of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, including the world-famous Mütter Museum, the Historical Medical Library, and our vast network of Fellows to create an engaging experience unlike any other youth program.

During the course of the program, students will achieve the following goals:

  • Learn about careers related to science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and healthcare/medicine.
  • Cultivate relationships between like-minded, motivated Philadelphia LGBTQIA students and professionals.
  • Develop a greater understanding of the body’s physiological response to stress.
  • Facilitate stress relieving techniques.
  • Address the impact of bullying and discrimination and develop responses.
  • Learn to communicate, heal, and build a community
  • Acquire practical job skills in a healthcare field by successfully completing a Phlebotomy Technician Certification (CPT)

The program consists of two parts. The first is a four-week summer internship that takes place through the month of July (the upcoming summer internship will take place July 5-27, 2018). The second part is an after-school program that takes place once a week through the 2018-2019 school year. Transit tokens to and from all events will be supplied by the Center for Education. Students will also receive a stipend upon successful completion of the program. With the exception of off-site field trips, all activities will take place at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (19 South 22nd Street).

Students in the OUt4STEM internship program examine plaster molds of footprint impressions during a lesson on crime scene investigation at Arcadia University

If you are interested in joining the Out4STEM Internship Program, you can fill out our online application. We require all students receive permission from a parent or guardian and provide contact information for a teacher or other adult mentor (coach, youth group leader, religious leader, etc.) who will serve as a reference. In order to better get to know you, we ask that you include in your application the answer the following question:

“What aspect of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is most interesting to you and why? How has identifying as LGBTQ influenced your interests in STEM?”

Your answer can take the form of a brief essay (MAX 750 words) or a video (MAX 10 minutes). If you choose to create a video, the format is up to you; just remember to answer the above prompt. Application materials must be submitted no later than 11:59PM on Monday, April 30, 2018.

If you have any questions, contact Quincy Greene, Youth, Support Coordinator. You can also learn more about the Out4STEM Internship Program by consulting our website.

The Out4STEM Internship program is made possible through a generous grant from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.

Now Accepting Applications for the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program!

Students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program pose in the Liberty Place Observation Deck

Are you a Philadelphia high school sophomore or junior who is interested in learning more about science, technology, engineering or math? Do you have a passion for social justice? Have you been affected by personal or community violence? If you answered “YES,” then you may be a strong candidate for the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program. We are currently accepting applications for students for our 2018-2019 cohort.

The Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program is a one-year summer and after-school internship directed at Philadelphia high school students with an interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) who have been impacted by community violence. Interns take part in lessons and activities designed to cultivate their strength and interest in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics; meet and interact with professionals in various STEM fields; learn to devise methods of coping with and responding to personal violence and violence in their communities; and cultivate a network of professional and emotional support among their peers. The Program also takes advantage of the unique resources of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, including the world-famous Mütter Museum, the Historical Medical Library, and our vast network of Fellows to create an engaging experience unlike any other youth program.

The program focuses on the following themes:

  • Learning and applying forensic techniques such as crime scene investigation, fingerprinting, and ballistics.
  • Understanding the health system’s response to individuals with traumatic gunshot wounds, including emergency room procedures, rehabilitation, and physical therapy
  • Understanding the body’s physiological response to stress and stress relief techniques
  • Learning to talk, heal, and build community with your peers.
  • Learning to network with STEM professionals and future mentors.

The program consists of two parts. The first is a four-week summer internship that takes place through the month of July (the upcoming summer internship will take place July 5-27, 2018). The second part is an after-school program that takes place once a week through the 2018-2019 school year. Transit tokens to and from all events will be supplied by the Center for Education. Students will also receive a stipend upon successful completion of the program. With the exception of off-site field trips, all activities will take place at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (19 South 22nd Street).

Students from the Center for Education's youth programs gather evidence from a human dummy simulating a victim at the Arcadia Crime Scene House

If you are interested in learning about exciting careers in STEM and want to help make a difference in your community, you can fill out our online application. Any rising 11-12th grader (will be in 11th or 12th grade in the upcoming school year) currently enrolled at a school in the Philadelphia School District (including charter schools) is welcome to apply; however, students from private schools are NOT eligible to apply. There are no costs to enroll or be enrolled in the program. We require all students receive permission from a parent or guardian and provide contact information for a teacher or other adult mentor (coach, youth group leader, religious leader, etc.) who will serve as a reference. In order to better get to know you, we ask that you include in your application the answer the following question:

“Based on your personal experience, explain how violence have affected your life or your community. What is one possible solution to reduce the impact of violence on you or your community?”

Your answer can take the form of a brief essay (MAX 750 words) or a video (MAX 10 minutes). If you choose to create a video, the format is up to you; just remember to answer the above prompt. Application materials must be submitted no later than 11:59PM on Monday, April 30, 2018.

If you have any questions, contact Quincy Greene, Youth, Support Coordinator. You can also learn more about the Teva Internship Program by consulting our website.

The Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship program is made possible through a generous grant from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.

 

The Teva Interns Prepare for the Robot Revolution

Students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program pose on the marble steps in front of the Franklin Institute

We have made it our goal to prepare the students in our various youth programs for the future. In a recent field trip, we gave them a glimpse of the technological future that in many ways is already here. Recently we took the students of the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program to visit Robot Revolution, a traveling exhibit currently on display at the Franklin Institute. The exhibit explores the practical applications of robots and challenges visitors to think about the ways mechanical systems work. Our students took on a robot in a game of tic tac toe, watched a heated soccer match played between teams of robots, and learned simple computer programming. They encountered machines programmed to mimic human facial expressions, comfort the sick, play blackjack, and even breakdance.  For our students interested in pursuing engineering and computer science fields, it gave a glimpse into what they could potentially do. For everyone, it was the chance to see just slightly into the future.

Students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program play blackjack with a robot at the Robot Revolution exhibit at the Franklin Institute

If you would like to check out the exhibit for yourself, Robot Revolution runs through April 2, 2017.

LGBTQ in STEM: A Panel Discussion

Out4STEM Tree Image Logo

Tomorrow (April 28, 2016) from 5:30-7:30 PM, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia will be hosting a panel discussion exploring the experiences of LGBTQ individuals in STEM.

Whether you are an LGBTQ-identified individual considering a career in STEM or an an institution, organization, or ally who wants to gain a greater understanding of the issues facing LGBTQ individuals in the STEM workplace, join us for this networking event. We will be hosting eight panelists representing a range of STEM-related fields who will speak to their experiences and respond to audience questions. Light refreshments will follow.

The program is free but registration is required.

Girl Scouts Become Bone Detectives

A Troop of Girl Scouts learn about forensic anthropology during our "Bone Detectives" activity

 

Our Museum Educator, Marcy Engleman, had a great experience with some girl scouts who are aspiring STEM experts. Here it is in her own words:

Last week I had the opportunity to do an outreach program at the meeting of a Girl Scout troop in southern New Jersey. They booked me to do my Bone Detectives lesson, which shows students about forensics and how to create a biological profile of a person using bones. The girls in the troop ranged from fourth to sixth grade, and were a bit rammy to start. But as soon as I started my lesson, they settled in to learn. They really loved telling me their personal stories, as young students loved to do, of finding animal bones in the woods, as well as helping me find out the age, sex and race of my ‘mystery’ skull. After the lesson was over, I had the chance to sit with the girls in a circle on the floor and have a chat about women in STEM fields: science, technology, engineering and math. It was a great opportunity to inspire the girls through word and action to aspire to great heights in their career path.

A Troop of Girl Scouts learn about forensic anthropology during our "Bone Detectives" activity