The Karabots Junior Fellows Test a Game About How HIV Spreads

A student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program plays CD4 Hunter, a mobile game about how HIV infects a healthy cell, on an iPad

Regular readers will know we frequently utilize games and game-based learning to create unique and memorable learning experiences for our students. Last year, our fourth cohort of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program playtested The Pox Hunter, a game about convincing Philadelphians in the early 18th century the importance of vaccines. They also designed their own forensic science themed board and card games, learned about the spread of disease by playing Pandemic 2, honed their powers of observation by taking part in a room escape, and tested their mental might with a series of thematic review games. Our fifth and most recent cohort has continued the legacy set forth by their predecessors, recently assisting Drexel University researchers playtest a game about how HIV infects health cells.

CD4 Hunter is a microbiology-themed mobile game currently under development by the Center for Business and Program Development of Drexel University’s Institute for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases and the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. It cast the player in the role of an HIV virus. The player’s goal is to infect healthy cells in order to spread create more virus cells while resisting antibiotics. IMMID developed the game to instruct the public by means of game-based learning on how HIV spreads in the body.

Under the guidance of Mary Ann Comunale, EDD, MS, who helps oversee the project, students started with a brief questionnaire to gauge their knowledge of HIV transmission and serve as a means of measuring what they learned by playing the game. Then they paired up with iPads or on their phones and played CD4 Hunter. As they played, they wrote down their thoughts on every aspect of the game, including visuals, sound, controls, how effected it conveyed its message, and (of course) fun. Students competed for high scores, with the top scorers earning a Dunkin Donuts gift card for their efforts. Dr. Comunale followed their play session with another questionnaire to gauge how much they learned about the subject while playing the game. Everyone gave useful feedback and many of them downloaded the game on their phones to play later. Afterwards, the Fellows met with a panel of three graduate students specializing in epidemiology, virology, and vaccines, who shared insights into their research and life in graduate school.

Two students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program play CD4 Hunter, a mobile game about how HIV infects a healthy cell, on an iPad

If you’d like to try CD4 Hunter for yourself, it is currently available for free on Apple iTunes and Google Play.

Advertisements

Philly Teens Help Raise Awareness at National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Four students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program stand behind a registration table at National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

This past Saturday, the College of Physicians hosted a day of events devoted to National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2017 (NBHAAD), and students from the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship and Out4STEM Programs were there to provide a helping hand.

The students offered outreach to visitors and helped register people for HIV testing (provided by Bebashi Transition to Hope, Prevention Point Philadelphia, The COLOURS Organization, and Q-Spot). Gloria Harley, an intern in both the Teva and Out4STEM Programs, joined ten other artists from The New Wave in a performance attended by over thirty Philadelphia teens.

Also attending the event were Dr. Loren Robinson, Deputy Secretary for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and Pennsylvania State Senator Vincent Hughes who delivered speeches on HIV Prevention and a demonstration on condom use.

Group photo of Philly teens, students in the Teva and Out4STEM programs, artists from New Wave, and Dr. Loren Robinson and Senator Vincent Hughes at the 2017 National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day at the Mütter Museum on February 11, 2017

Overall it was a great day of HIV Awareness and artistic expression thanks to our distinguished guests and our dedicated interns! Most important, 85 people received HIV/AIDS testing (and earned free admission to the Mütter Museum in the process).

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day at the Mütter: February 11, 2017

Four students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship pose with signs displaying various facts about HIV/AIDS at World AIDS Day 2016

Did you know that the rate of HIV infection among African Americans is eight times that among whites, or that gay and bisexual men make up the majority of new infections among African Americans? February 7 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), a day for spreading awareness of the impact HIV plays in the African American community. The goal is to encourage more people to get tested and dispel the social stigmas surrounding the disease.The logo for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a black field with a red and green strip running vertically along the left side and a white vertical bar along the right. The words FIGHT HIV/AIDS are printed in white block letters in the middle and the hashtag #NBHAAD appears in black block letters in the white bar

This Saturday, February 11, 2017, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia will be observing NBHAAD with a day-long event. We will be offering FREE HIV testing courtesy of Bebashi Transition to Hope and Q-Spot. Never taken an HIV test? Fear not, as the test is painless, takes only a minute (literally 60 seconds) and entitles you to FREE admission to the Mütter Museum. There will be live performances and information about HIV/AIDS to help expand your understanding of the impact of the impact of the disease. 51% of HIV-positive people don’t know they have it; help us spread the word about the disease and take a trip to the Museum! The event will take place from 10 AM to 4 PM.

CEPI Youth Help People Get Tested at World AIDS Day 2016

Four students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship pose with signs displaying various facts about HIV/AIDS at World AIDS Day 2016

On December 3, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia observed World AIDS Day 2016 with a day-long event to promote HIV/AIDS awareness, dispel the stigma and misconceptions associated with the disease, and encourage people to get tested. Visitors to the Mütter Museum received free admission in exchange for an HIV test (they involve a simple blood sample and test results are known in 60 seconds, a small price to pay for a day at the Museum and certainty over one’s status). It was a large undertaking; fortunately we had on hand a dedicated group of CEPI youth to help out.

Representing the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program, and the Out4STEM Program, our intrepid volunteers were instrumental in logistics, education, and promotion. They directed visitors who came to get tested to make sure the process was as quick and easy as possible. They encouraged people to pose with images of HIV/AIDS-related facts and share them on social media. They also helped educate the public with small health-related lessons, including a lesson on bone pathology using models of human skulls. Overall they helped make for a successful event wherein we tested eighty-five people!

Sara, a student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, teaches two students about skull pathology by displaying a group of human skull replicas at World AIDS Day 2016

 

World AIDS Day at the Mütter Museum: December 3, 2016

Promotional flyer for World AIDS Day 2016 at the Mütter Museum, December 3, 2016

Did you know more than 1.2 million Americans are living with HIV? Did you know that 1 in 8 people living with HIV are not aware they have it? December 1 is World AIDS Day, a day devoted to spreading awareness of HIV/AIDS, offering support to the millions living with the disease, and remembering those who have died from it.

On Saturday, December 3, 2016, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia will be commemorating World AIDS Day with a day-long event to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS, enumerate the facts and myths related to the disease, and encourage everyone to get tested. The College of Physicians of Philadelphia will be offering 60 second tests to any member of the public 13 years or older (testing is provided by Bebashi) with free admission to the Mütter Museum to whomever gets tested. The event will take place from 10 AM-5 PM.

Get Tested and Spread Awareness at National HIV Testing Day (June 26, 2016)

Flyer for National HIV Testing Day at the College of Physicians of PhiladelphiaDid you know that roughly one in five people who have HIV are not aware they carry the virus? This SUNDAY, JUNE 26, the College of Physicians will be hosting National HIV Testing Day. Come to the College and the Mütter Museum to learn about HIV/AIDS and get a free screening. The event will take place from 10 AM-4 PM.

Visitors will learn more about why it is important to get tested and how to live well with HIV/AIDS. Visitors will also have special access to the Historical Medical Library and be able to view a special pop-up exhibit about the history of sexually transmitted infections. Free yoga classes (between 2 and 4pm) will be offered along with information and activities to encourage informed decisions about health. Also on view will be panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt, and the “1981 – Until it’s Over” timeline, courtesy of the AIDS Fund. Also on display will be “I’m Positive,” an interactive game developed for the CDC to teach about coping with HIV.

HIV (and STD) testing will be available onsite (provided by Bebashi and Q-Spot), and anyone that gets tested for HIV will be given FREE entrance to the museum. This is also a special STAMP event.

Note: Entry to the museum is free only for those with the STAMP pass and to anyone who gets tested for HIV onsite. (Find ticket info and general museum hours here) The Mütter Museum is also part of the Access Admission program. Access/EBT cardholders can come for $2 and bring three additional family members for $2 each.

Math can be useful sometimes…

On February 7, 2016, the Mütter Museum celebrated National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day for the first time ever. One of the ways we decorated the building was to create a ribbon on the stair risers up the main staircase. This is not an easy thing to do. Ella, Margaret and Jayne, who are seniors from Friends Select School, with the assistance of Kevin and Ja’Nelle, two of our KJF3 students, created and installed the ribbon. You can see how complicated it is and it took hours to complete, but the end result was very eye-catching. It immediately indicated that something special was happening on this day in the museum.

The designs for the ribbon for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, 2/7/2016

Our volunteers carefully mapped out the dimensions…

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program assembling the ribbon for National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, on the College of Physicians steps, 2/7/2016

…then worked together to put their plan for the ribbon into action!

The completed ribbon commemorating National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, 2/6/2016

The end result is amazing.

The event was a huge success with more than 70 people getting tested for HIV. Many more left with greater knowledge of the disease. The ribbon provided the perfect “photo spot” for many people during the day.

Attendees of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day posing in front of the NBHAAD ribbon, 2/6/2016