Mixed Signals: A New Exhibit at the Mütter Museum

Main exhibit label for Mixed Signals: A Study of Cancer

If you haven’t visited The Mütter Museum in a while, this fall is a nice time for a return to The Birthplace of American Medicine. On October 17, 2019, The Mütter Museum unveiled Spit Spreads Death: The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 in Philadelphia, a large new exhibit examining the 1918-19 influenza pandemic, how it affected Philadelphians, and the ways the deadliest outbreak in human history influenced public health to this day.

This month, students in the The Karabots Junior Fellows program made their own addition to the Museum. Mixed Signals: A Study of Cancer offers Museum visitors an overview of cancer, how cancer behaves, various ways it is treated, and ways you can help reduce your risk. The exhibit was a joint program between The Center for Education of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia and Swarthmore College and was made possible through a grant from The National Science Foundation.

It was the product of a year’s worth of careful planning and meticulous research by students in the fifth cohort of The Karabots Junior Fellows program. We have covered the exploits of the Karabots students numerous times here. For the uninitiated, The Karabots Junior Fellows Program is a three-year after-school and summer internship program for Philadelphia high school students from underserved communities with an interest in pursuing careers in healthcare, medicine, and science.

The project began in August 2018 with an intensive two-week summer program where the students built up their knowledge of cancer and cell signaling. Brad Davidson, Associate Professor of developmental biology at Swarthmore, and his student assistant, Allie Naganuma, taught our students how cells grow and develop by sending and receiving signals. If these signals are disrupted through mutations, cellular miscommunication can lead to an overgrowth of abnormal cells. These abnormal cells build up over time to form tumors. If they are not detected and treated early, these growths can affect how the body works, eventually spreading to other parts of the body and adversely affecting a person’s health. The Karabots students also met with experts in a variety of related fields, including cancer biology, pathology, and treatment; biomedical research; hospice and palliative care; physical therapy; and mental health. Their work over the summer gave them the necessary tools to tackle such a complex subject and apply their knowledge to and share what they learned with others.

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program take part in an activity about cancer biology by assembling walls made of Legos

When the students met for their weekly sessions for the 2018-2019 school year, we divided them into two teams: Exhibit and Outreach. The exhibit team worked together to select materials from The College’s collection, including biological specimens and medical tools as well as physical and digital objects from the Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Over the course of the school year, they conducted research, drafted labels, and worked with professional exhibit designer Jordan Klein to bring their exhibit to life. The culmination of all their hard work was Mixed Signals: A Study of Cancer, which officially opened to the public on November 5, 2019.

Meanwhile, the Outreach team was hard at work distilling what they learned into a lesson designed to teach middle school students about cancer. Together they developed a presentation, created and tested interactive activities, and crafted a lesson plan. In Summer 2019, two of our students–Lamina and Chaka–traveled to Swarthmore to deliver their lesson to a middle school youth program. They also had the opportunity to mentor the newest cohort of Karabots Junior Fellows, delivering their cancer lesson to the new students later in the summer. The lesson, also called Mixed Signals: A Study of Cancer, is currently available to visiting field trips to The Mütter Museum (book your field trip today).

Lamina and Chaka, students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, deliver a lesson on cancer to students in the latest cohort in the program

Our students learned a great deal along the way. In addition to applying their medical learning, they strengthened their aptitude in valuable skills they can apply to any future career they pursue, including collaboration, independent study, and oral and written communications skills.

If you are thinking of visiting the Mütter Museum again or for the first time, be sure to see our new exhibits.

Air Pollution: How Air Affects Us, and How We Affect Air

Healthy environments lead to healthy inhabitants. Just as much as we affect the environment with our actions, the environment affects us whenever we interact with it, which as you can imagine happens quite often. One of the most important necessities for our body is oxygen, which of course comes from the air. Since we depend on the contents of the air so much, it goes without saying that pollution in the air is not good for humanity, or anything on the planet for that matter. This kind of pollution is a bigger killer than some may realize at first glance, and it is highly likely it will continue to get bigger at the current rate. Currently, outdoor and indoor air pollution are responsible for 4.2 million and 3.8 million deaths per year respectively. Over 90% of the world’s population lives somewhere in which air quality falls outside of the standard air quality guidelines as set by the WHO.

A photograph taken in Philadelphia

A photograph taken in Philadelphia, the Mütter Museum’s hometown

Air pollution is also responsible for the following:

  • 29% of all deaths and disease from lung cancer
  • 17% of all deaths and disease from acute lower respiratory infection
  • 24% of all deaths from stroke
  • 25% of all deaths and disease from ischaemic heart disease
  • 43% of all deaths and disease from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Despite air pollution affecting every population, there are certain populations that are actually more affected than others. Generally speaking, lower income countries, as well as communities that live near high traffic and industrial sites are the ones that are most likely to be impacted by pollution in the air. About 90% of deaths mentioned in the aforementioned premature death statistic happened within countries that are considered mid-income to low-income.

Encased coal miner's lung

A visual example of how breathing in poor air can affect lungs on a greater scale to give an idea of how similar effects can take place on an everyday level.
Image taken from Mütter Museum collection.

Another important factor to take note of when speaking of air pollution is people who already have pre-existing conditions unrelated to the pollution. The pollution can worsen an existing condition, especially in young children and elders. These include heart disease, lung disease, and asthma. Even lungs that are not fully developed yet can have reductions in their growth rate or ability to function if exposed.

Our own health isn’t the only thing at risk. The environment that we all live in is doomed to meet a similar fate if air pollution stays a prominent factor. The climate and ecosystems all around the globe can deteriorate as much as we can, and they already have started to show some signs that they are. Specific pollutants such as methane and black carbon are powerful contributors to changes that can be alarming in the long run such as climate change and productivity in agriculture. Just looking at recent events, such as how climate change is talked about politically, or how the amazon forest fires started up, we can see that the once negative possibilities of pollution are already starting to become a reality, and will only get worse if things are not changed from their current state.
What can we do? First, it’s vital to know what role we as a society have in making air pollution worse. Some of the ways that humans have a direct impact on air quality include:

  • Fuel combustion
  • Generating of heat and power
  • Industrial work
  • Burning of waste
  • Using polluting fuels to cook, heat, and light
Factory emitting exhaust into the sky

Factory emitting exhaust into the sky; one example of many of how we pollute the air.

It is becoming more apparent each day that we need to take some sort of action if we want air pollution to stop affecting us and the environment. This is not a problem that will just go away if we wait long enough. Cooperation across all sectors in reducing our reliance on damaging aspects of life, while a hard task to accomplish, is crucial to kick-starting the end to the problem. Society needs to start making the change to cleaner transportation and power before the negative effects become worse than they already are, and that should just be the beginning. Changes in city structuring, recycling as much as possible, replacing appliances that are damaging, and much more can help make a difference both in the short and long term. If you care about the issue, it can’t hurt to spread the information in any way you can, as awareness on the problem at hand is the first step to making the change. You can’t just buy another Earth if it goes kaput like you can with a cell phone or something like that, so it’s important to take care of the one we have.

Sources:
https://www.edf.org/health/health-impacts-air-pollution
Environmental Defense Fund: Health Impacts of Air Pollution

https://www.who.int/airpollution/en/
World Health Organization: Air Pollution

Now Accepting Applications for the Teva Pharmaceuticals STEM Internship

The 2016 cohort of the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship program pose with Teva employees and hold certificates of completion for completing their summer internship

Are you a Philadelphia high school sophomore or junior who is interested in learning more about science, technology, engineering or math? Do you have a passion for social justice? Have you been affected by personal or community violence? If you answered “YES,” then you may be a strong candidate for the Teva Pharmaceuticals STEM Internship Program. We are currently accepting applications for students for our 2018-2019 cohort.

The Teva Pharmaceuticals STEM Internship Program is a one-year summer and after-school internship directed at Philadelphia high school students with an interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) who have been impacted by community violence. Interns take part in lessons and activities designed to cultivate their strength and interest in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics; meet and interact with professionals in various STEM fields; learn to devise methods of coping with and responding to personal violence and violence in their communities; and cultivate a network of professional and emotional support among their peers. The Program also takes advantage of the unique resources of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, including the world-famous Mütter Museum, the Historical Medical Library, and our vast network of Fellows to create an engaging experience unlike any other youth program.

The program focuses on the following themes:

  • Learning and applying forensic techniques such as crime scene investigation, fingerprinting, and ballistics.
  • Understanding the health system’s response to individuals with traumatic gunshot wounds, including emergency room procedures, rehabilitation, and physical therapy
  • Understanding the body’s physiological response to stress and stress relief techniques
  • Learning to talk, heal, and build community with your peers.
  • Learning to network with STEM professionals and future mentors.

The program consists of two parts. The first is a four-week summer internship that takes place through the month of July 2019. The second part is an after-school program that takes place once a week through the 2018-2019 school year. Transit keycards to and from all events will be supplied by the Center for Education. Students will also receive a stipend upon successful completion of the program. With the exception of off-site field trips, all activities will take place at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (19 South 22nd Street).

Four students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship pose with signs displaying various facts about HIV/AIDS at World AIDS Day 2016

If you are interested in learning about exciting careers in STEM and want to help make a difference in your community, you can fill out our online application. Any rising 11-12th grader (will be in 11th or 12th grade in the upcoming school year) currently enrolled at a school in the Philadelphia School District (including charter schools) is welcome to apply; however, students from private schools are NOT eligible to apply. There are no costs to enroll or be enrolled in the program. We require all students receive permission from a parent or guardian and provide contact information for a teacher or other adult mentor (coach, youth group leader, religious leader, etc.) who will serve as a reference. In order to better get to know you, we ask that you include in your application the answer the following question:

“Based on your personal experience, explain how violence have affected your life or your community. What is one possible solution to reduce the impact of violence on you or your community?”

Your answer can take the form of a brief essay (MAX 750 words) or a video (MAX 10 minutes). If you choose to create a video, the format is up to you; just remember to answer the above prompt. Application materials must be submitted no later than 11:59PM on Friday, May 31, 2019.

If you have any questions, contact Sarah Lumbo, Teen Health Programs Coordinator. You can also learn more about the Teva Internship Program by consulting our website.

The Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship program is made possible through a generous grant from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.

Now Accepting Applications for the Out4STEM Program

A student from the Out4STEM Program dissects a sheep's brain.

Attention, Philadelphia high school students: we are excited to announce the College of Physicians of Philadelphia is now accepting applications for the 2019-2020 cohort of the out4STEM Internship Program!

The out4STEM Internship Program is a one-year, summer and after-school internship program aimed at LGBTQIA high school students in Philadelphia who have an interest in healthcare/medicine or science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The Program also seeks to address the unique challenges facing Philadelphia LGBTQIA youth in an accepting, STEM-oriented safe space. The Program takes advantage of the unique resources of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, including the world-famous Mütter Museum, the Historical Medical Library, and our vast network of Fellows to create an engaging experience unlike any other youth program.

During the course of the program, students will achieve the following goals:

  • Learn about careers related to science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and healthcare/medicine.
  • Cultivate relationships between like-minded, motivated Philadelphia LGBTQIA students and professionals.
  • Develop a greater understanding of the body’s physiological response to stress.
  • Facilitate stress-relieving techniques.
  • Address the impact of bullying and discrimination and develop responses.
  • Learn to communicate, heal, and build a community.

Out4STEM Students showing off their masks at the Masquerade 2015

The program consists of two parts. The first is a four-week summer internship that takes place through the month of July (the upcoming summer internship will take place July 5-27, 2019). The second part is an after-school program that takes place once a week through the 2019-2020 school year. Transit tokens to and from all events will be supplied by the Center for Education. Students will also receive a stipend upon successful completion of the program. With the exception of off-site field trips, all activities will take place at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (19 South 22nd Street).

In order to be eligible for the Out4STEM Internship Program, candidates must meet the following requirements (Note: There are no costs to enroll or be enrolled in the Out4STEM Internship Program):

  • Currently enrolled in a high school within the Philadelphia School District, including public, private, parochial, or charter schools.
  • Possess an interest in healthcare, medicine, or STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math)

Interested students must submit an application form form accompanied by the following items:

If you are interested in joining the out4STEM Internship Program, you can fill out our online application. We require all students receive permission from a parent or guardian and provide contact information for a teacher or other adult mentor (coach, youth group leader, religious leader, etc.) who will serve as a reference. In order to better get to know you, we ask that you include in your application the answer the following questions:

1) “What aspect of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is most interesting to you and why?”
2) “What do you hope to get out of being a member of the out4STEM Program?”

Your answer can take the form of a brief essay (MAX 750 words) or a video (MAX 10 minutes). If you choose to create a video, the format is up to you; just remember to answer the above prompt. Selected applicants will be asked to take part in an interview. All applicants must be prepared to submit a work permit (information on how to obtain one can be found here).

Application materials must be submitted no later than 11:59PM on Friday, May 31, 2019.

If you have any questions, contact Victor Gomes, the out4STEM Coordinator (vgomes@collegeofphysicians.org). You can also learn more about the out4STEM Internship Program by consulting our website or checking our Frequently Asked Questions.

The out4STEM Internship program is made possible through a generous grant from Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.

Philly 9th Graders: Join the Karabots Junior Fellows Program!

Two students from the Karabots Junior Fellows Program experiment with a Laënnec stethoscope

Are you a Philly 9th grader with an interest in health care or medicine? Are you a Philadelphia public or charter school teacher or counselor who knows 9th graders who are interested in careers in medicine?

The Center for Education of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia is now accepting applications for the Summer 2019 installment of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program.

Founded in 2009, the Karabots Junior Fellows Program is for Philadelphia high school students interested in pursuing careers in medicine. Through hands-on activities, innovative educational programming, interactions with healthcare professionals, and engagements through the unique resources of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (including the world-renowned Mütter Museum and the Historical Medical Library), the Program introduces students to the diverse fields available in healthcare and medicine. It also empowers students to take charge of their health and encourage healthy lifestyle choices for their families and their communities.

Students in the KArabots Junior Fellows Program monitor each other's blood pressure at Drexel University's Physical Therapy Lab

The next summer program will take place August 12-23, 2019. This year’s theme is “Defeating Disease,” focusing on the biology, treatment, and response to infectious disease from a variety of scientific, medical, and historical perspectives.

Participants may also have the possibility to stay for a multi-year after-school program focused on healthcare, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), academic and career advisement, and college preparation that goes through twelfth grade.

Students interested in joining the Karabots Junior Fellows Program must fulfill the following requirements:

  • They must be entering the 10th grade in Fall 2019.
  • They must be a Philadelphia resident.
  • They must be attending a Philadelphia public or charter high school.
  • They must have an interest in biology and the healthcare professions.
  • They will be the first in their immediate family to graduate from a college or university.
  • They must qualify for a FREE or REDUCED PRICE school lunch.
  • They may not have any disciplinary problems on their school record.
  • They must have permission from a parent/guardian to take part in the program.
  • They must be prepared to provide a work permit if they are brought in for an interview (more information on obtaining a work permit).

The Karabots Junior Fellows take part in a yoga demonstration led by Laura Baehr

Interested students can complete our online application form. The application must include the name and contact information of an adult supporter (parent, guardian, or adult over the age of 18 willing to vouch for the student), a reference from a teacher or counselor, and a brief personal statement in the form of an essay, video, or audio clip. The deadline to apply is 11:59PM on Friday, May 31, 2019.

To learn more about the program, please consult our website or check out our FAQ. Direct all inquiries to Kevin D. Impellizeri, Assistant Director of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program (email: kimpellizeri@collegeofphysicians.org; phone: 215-372-7313).

 

A Disturbingly Informative Trip to the Woodlands Cemetery

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program demonstrate specimens to attendees of the Halloween Family Fun Day event at the Woodlands Cemetery

On October 21, students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program traveled to the Woodlands to give visitors a small glimpse into the interesting and surprising specimens and objects in the College of Physicians of Philadelphia’s vast collection. Longtime readers will recall the Woodlands is a common field trip location for students in the Karabots Program and representatives of the Mütter Museum, including Karabots students, have participated in numerous events hosted by the Woodlands.

A group photo of students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program in the Hamilton mansion at the Woodlands Cemetery

Established as the country home of Philadelphia socialite William Hamilton, the Woodlands became an active cemetery in 1840; it is the final resting place of numerous noteworthy Philadelphians, including several Fellows of the College of Physicians, such as Silas Weir Mitchell, John Ashhurst, and William Williams Keen, and the founder of the Campbells Soup Company among other notables. It is also the site of the largest grave marker in the United States, an 84-foot tall obelisk constructed for famous dentist and Penn Dental school founder Thomas Wiltberger Evans.

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program demonstrate specimens to attendees of the Halloween Family Fun Day event at the Woodlands Cemetery

Our students were on-site as part of the Woodlands annual Halloween Family Fun Day, where visitors come to the historic rural cemetery to take part in fun activities. Visitors of all ages came dressed in costumes for Halloween and there was even a pet costume contest in which a dog dressed as a pumpkin took the grand prize. Our students spent the afternoon in the Hamilton Mansion demonstrating “Mini Mütter,” a sampling of the unique items on display at the Mütter Museum. The Junior Fellows displayed such items as anatomical models, replicas of bones and museum specimens (such as an arm with smallpox and a foot with elephantiasis), preserved brain slides, and a collection of Civil War medical tools. Several students even led anatomy-themed games, challenging visitors to identify bones, label pieces of the heart, and demonstrate using different parts of their brain. Our students acted as great ambassadors for the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, showed off their knowledge, and honed their public speaking skills. Just as important, they introduced people young and old to the amazing collections available at the Mütter Museum and offered insights into medicine and human anatomy.

Portrait of a Fellow: Chevalier Jackson

Greetings and salutations, fellow historico-medico aficionados. Today’s installment is the second in a series we are calling “Portrait of a Fellow,” where we introduce you to notable medical professionals who make up our esteemed body of Fellows of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. The first article in this series highlighted noted physician and civil rights activist Nathan Francis Mossell. Today, we welcome another guest author to make you better acquainted with another of our past Fellows. I turn the floor over to Xavier Gavin, one of our dedicated team of Mütter Museum docents and an alum of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program. He is here to talk about noted otolaryngologist Chevalier Jackson. 

Take it away, Xavier!

The Chevalier Jackson collection is a large assortment of objects that were once swallowed by people accidentally. The collection has over 2000 objects, most of which are on display inside of the staircase in drawers on the lower level in the Mütter Museum. The objects range from pins, to buttons, to animal bones, to Cracker Jack figures, and so on.

Swallowed Objects from the Chevalier Jackson Collection, College of Physicians of Philadelphia

Swallowed Objects from the Chevalier Jackson Collection, College of Physicians of Philadelphia

Chevalier Jackson was born in Pittsburgh in 1865. Jackson’s childhood was full of trouble and trauma. He was bullied in school continuously because of his sensitive demeanor and small stature; once, bullies threw him into an abandoned mine. However, as a child, he always seemed to be drawn to statistics and recording information. When he became interested in skating, he recorded his falls and casualties for reference, which may have helped lead to his interest in records and the like for a future career. Later he worked with pipes and plumbing, inspiring his future endeavors in developing medical tools.

Jackson attended Western University of Pennsylvania, now known as the University of Pittsburgh. While in college, Jackson dabbled in art, specifically that of decorating glasses and china. This side work helped him support his family, pay for his medical school, and helped him cultivate his illustrating skills, which he later put to use when illustrating his techniques in bronchoscopy, helping further his goal of educating others in the field.

https://cepiatcpp.files.wordpress.com/2016/08/chevalier.jpg

Jackson earned public recognition through his work as an otolaryngologist, more commonly known as an ear nose and throat specialist. This field was still relatively new in the late 1800s and the early 1900s, the time when Jackson was practicing. It was during this period that he started collecting swallowed objects he extracted from patients. Jackson created and tended to this collection in order to help educate doctors on the field and to let them know more about what to expect in the field. Jackson never charged a patient any money for extracting an object. All he asked was that he could keep the object for his records. In 1924, Jackson donated his collection of swallowed objects and records to the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Safety pins are probably the most abundant type of object in the collection. It was likely such a commonly swallowed object because seamstresses would hold pins in their mouths, or parents would hold them in their mouths while changing a baby’s diaper, or babies removed them from their diapers. Jackson was said to be even good enough at this craft of removing objects to push a pin down into the stomach where there’s more room, close it, and then safely extract it without puncturing anything vital.

X-ray showing safety pin and button in a 10-day-old infant’s airway, 1934, Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

X-ray showing safety pin and button in a 10-day-old infant’s airway, 1934, Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

Jackson’s accomplishments earned him the nickname the “father of laryngoscopy.” In addition to his swallowed objects collection, Jackson invented a special tool called a laryngoscope. Jackson’s laryngoscope included a light he used to see into a patient’s throat as well as a long pair of tweezers with clamps on the end to grab the object. Jackson also had a doll named Michelle made so he could practice the procedure on something human-like and teach others his methods for extracting objects swallowed by children.

Chevalier Jackson demonstrating Michelle the Choking Doll, Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

Chevalier Jackson demonstrating Michelle the Choking Doll, Historical Medical Library of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

Jackson is also credited with campaigning for proper labeling and classification of anything containing poison. In all of the procedures of removing swallowed objects he endured, Jackson noticed various burns and injuries due to children consuming lye and other poisonous substances. Jackson realized this was a common problem due to the lack of essential warnings on packages or any federal regulation of hazardous substances. Jackson held countless meetings, presentations, and lectures, and his efforts eventually led to the creation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act  in 1925.

Chevalier Jackson has many achievements to his name. Whether people realize it or not, his work is extremely vital to the safety of people of all ages and the advancement of this particular field in medicine. His work goes much further than just what you see in those drawers.

Thanks for the article, Xavier! If you’d like to see the Chevalier Jackson collection for yourself, it is on display (along with lots of other interesting items from the history of medicine) here at the Mütter Museum!